Example of racial diversity: Captain Planet

Example of cultural diversity: Captain Planet

This series was an example of both racial AND cultural diversity through its main cast, which featured an American boy, Wheeler; a Russian (then Soviet Union) girl, Linka; a French girl, Gi; a Brazilian boy, Ma-Ti; and an African boy from an unspecified country, Kwame (though his name suggests that he is from Ghana). Together, these teens worked together to help fight dangers to the environment and spread awareness of important issues. They were given powers by a racially ambiguous Earth Spirit named Gaia, and when they combined their powers, they formed Captain Planet, as featured above. The show ran for six seasons.

Example of racial diversity: Orange is the New Black

Example of gender identity diversity: Orange is the New Black

Example of class diversity: Orange is the New Black

Example of age diversity: Orange is the New Black

Example of sexual diversity: Orange is the New Black

Example of body type diversity: Orange is the New Black

This series is an example of racial diversity through the different groups of women in the prison, with many different members of the cast who are Latina/Hispanic or African-American.

This series is an example of gender identity through Laverne Cox, the trans woman who plays a trans woman inside the prison.

This series is an example of class diversity through the many different levels of class the inmates come from. Piper and her immediate circle of friends come from the upper class, with several women coming in at working middle class, and several others in the group at in the lower class.

This series is an example of age diversity through the different age groups the cast members come from. The youngest was stated to be 19, while the oldest known cast member’s age is 59.

This series is an example of sexual diversity, as it showcases characters who are straight, lesbian, and bisexual.

This series is an example of body image diversity, as the characters show a variety of body types.

Example of gender identity diversity: WOMEN in English/ Mujeres en Espanol!

Example of body type diversity: WOMEN in English/ Mujeres en Espanol!

Example of age diversity: WOMEN in English/ Mujeres en Espanol!

Example of racial diversity: WOMEN in English/ Mujeres en Espanol!

This series of illustrations shows gender identity diversity through the inclusions of someone who appears to be a trans woman, as well as someone who appears to be a cis woman, but feels most comfortable in menswear.

This series of illustrations more than qualifies as an example of body type diversity through several women in the collection. Some are around a societal weight ‘norm’, while others are shown as under it, and others are shown as far above it. All of these women are shown as beautiful.

This series of illustrations shows age diversity by showing women at several ages, from children to elderly.

This series of illustrations shows racial diversity by showing women of several races, including (but not limited to) women who appear to be of Latina/Hispanic origin, women who appear to be of African descent, women who appear to be of Asian descent, and several women whose race can’t be determined through the illustrations.

And while they didn’t qualify for the categories of ability diversity, there are also two illustrations that contain women who are in wheelchairs, one of them being a WOC, the other frankly discussing the issues associated with common treatments of disabled persons in society. The series of illustrations also barely did not qualify for the category of sexual diversity, as it frankly discussed some of the less kind treatment that women who identify as lesbians are often shown (with a biracial lesbian couple) as well as a woman who was openly bisexual.

There is a link to her original gallery here, in Spanish, as well as one where she has translated her works into English. There is also a group that is translating her illustrations into Hebrew.

ANNOUNCEMENT

I will be spending much more time on here in the very near future, and as such, I have some things to announce.

The first is that I have lifted the rule on this blog only examining American media. I created this rule at the beginning because I was wary of being critical of media from other cultures — where it would be much easier for me to miss cultural clues, or where it would be much easier to get something wrong, even with the vast resources the Internet can provide. I’m much more comfortable in my role here, now, and as such, I recognize that I WILL screw up… and that’s why I depend on my lovely followers to catch me when they see that happen. If you are one of the lovely people who has done that already, thank you.

The second is that there will be new posts on here coming very shortly, and that I will be going back to examine previously declined suggestions to see what I can review that has already been requested.

Thank you!

—FYDII

posted 2 weeks ago with 3 notes
#frommetoyou
getit-gotit-good:
Um hi I really like your blog (I think I've said that before lol) and I have a question. I was wondering what you thought about the X-Men being based of the the struggle of people of color and Magneto and Professor X being likened to Malcolm X and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Hi! Sorry I haven’t been on much — I recently got a job, and between that and another group I’m running, I haven’t had much time lately to look over things for this blog.

That being said:

Thank you for the question! I’m a fairly huge Marvel fan, so I do feel at least a little able to answer it.

I think that in the beginning, the X-Men was very closely linked to the civil rights struggle at the time, and that you can’t ignore the social and political events that were happening when the X-Men was created. The X-Men were created in 1963, almost year before the Civil Rights Act was passed in 1964, and that those two figures likely did have a very large influence on the initial characters of Charles Xavier (Professor X) and Erik Lehnsherr (Magneto).

However, the franchise has been around for 50 years, and the story and the concepts behind the X-Men have changed with the times. While the basic rights concept of the X-Men still remained present in the comics, especially with those who were very visually different than the human ‘norm’, other causes — such as women’s rights and LGBT+ rights — also began to be woven into the story line.

I see this as a very good thing. While civil rights, women’s rights, and LGBT+ rights can all be very large, very daunting topics to talk about on their own, having a story and having characters and representation of other world views and having them talk frankly about issues facing their universe, a universe that has more than a passing resemblance to ours, is a way to open up the conversations to hundreds of thousands of readers — many of whom are younger, and who likely haven’t been exposed to the world beyond their neighborhood/city. Giving them characters to care about removes the argument that they don’t know anyone who faces those issues, because even if they go their whole life surrounded by people who choose to make racist comments and never get called on them, they now know (for some of the most famous examples) Mystique and Nightcrawler, who have both faced intense discrimination for having blue skin, as well as several other characters who faced similar problems (and had more human-looking skin).

This isn’t to say that the X-Men have always been 100% advancing civil rights and talking frankly about societal problems and that they’ve always done a good job with diversity. They haven’t. The first regular POC (and WOC) X-Member was Storm, a character who didn’t come around until the 70s. Is it wrong to try to tell the story of racism without having POC characters, and many of them? Yes. But the X-Men had human writers who were as subject to lines of thinking of the time as anyone else, and many times those modes of thinking blotted out what they might have been trying to say earlier.

That doesn’t make it right. That makes it understandable. And if you understand the mistake, you can avoid it in the future.

So, to answer the question you asked before social and comic commentary came and hijacked my answer?

I think that it’s really cool that people — both in the past and now — are getting engaged in this ongoing discussion of racism and how it affects people, however they enter that discussion. However, if you’re going to go looking for characters like MLK Jr. and Malcolm X, it’s better if you just go to the original people who fought and lived and died in the pursuit of their ideals. Not only will you get a better sense of history… there will also be fewer clones, evil twins, pocket dimensions, plot gaps, and other assorted headaches to struggle through.

Anonymous:
sorry this is about Fargo (the fx series) again but i just found out the deaf (possibly mute) character Mr Wrench is played by deaf actor Russell Harvard also in episode 5 Mr wrench and mr numbers have a conversation in ASL using one hand and you just don't see that on tv shows. I thought this was super important for people to know :)

It is. Visual reminders that not everyone possesses the same level of ability are very valuable!

— FYDII

posted 2 months ago with 1 note
#asks #discussion #Anonymous
getit-gotit-good:
Wtf this is the most important blog I've ever come across. This is absolutely amazing. I love you. Everything is wonderful.

Oh my gosh! Thank you so much!

—FYDII

posted 2 months ago with 1 note
#asks #getit-gotit-good
Anonymous:
I hope this is ok to post but FX's Fargo has a character in it (Mr Wrench) who is mute and speaks in ASL (american sign language) as i have never seen a character on a mainstream crime drama use sign language before I thought this would be super important to your blog :)

It is! While I have seen a few other deaf/hard-of-hearing characters on television, often times they (like so many other people with disabilities) only show up during Very Special Episodes. Thank you for telling me about this!

— FYDII

posted 2 months ago with 1 note
#asks #Anonymous

shakeyourmanetmaker:

fyeahdiversityinimages:

Example of racial diversity: Grey’s Anatomy

Example of sexual diversity: Grey’s Anatomy

The show is an example of racial diversity through the main actors. Chandra Wilson, who plays Dr. Miranda Bailey, is an African American woman in a position of power over others in the show. Sara Ramirez, who plays Dr. Callie Torres, is a bisexual Mexican-American woman who has consistently been shown in biracial relationships. James Pickens Jr., an African-American man, plays Dr. Richard Webber, who was also depicted in a position of authority. At the last of regulars, Sandra Oh, a Korean-Canadian woman, plays Dr. Cristina Yang, who also has consistently been shown in biracial relationships.

Grey’s Anatomy also shows sexual diversity in its characters. Jessica Capshaw plays as Dr. Arizona Robbins, a lesbian, who is in a long-term committed relationship with Ramirez’s Torres.

Considering that this show is in it’s tenth season, I’m sure that I’ve missed examples of diversity. I have also been warned that this show includes a lot things that would be categorized as problematic, but I didn’t get any more information than that. If you have something else you think should be added, please comment on it!

Hey so, I used to watch this show regularly when it first started airing, but it ran into several speedbumps after the first season once the writer strike started up. (That’s the reason season 2 is twice as long as the other seasons.) I picked it up after that season but most of the points that I had problems with didn’t get resolved so I stopped watching it consistently after that. I’ve been watching more regularly since the plane crash.

It takes a really long time for the nonwhite characters to be given any dimensionality. Longer than the white members of the cast (save for Sandra Oh’s character). For a show that has a racially mixed cast when it started and more recently, from about season 2 to season 7 introduces mostly white recurring characters. Certain doctors harbor biases, like ablism, though it is shown that not all the doctors share the same opinions. However, the topics are never discussed and are only every present to further personal plots or episodes. For instance, it turns out that a point in one episode where a doctor asks why a couple hasn’t had their child fitted with a cochlear implant  was really just a way for that doctor and his wife to have a fight about how his reaction to the parents’ decision (he calls the parents incompetent later in the show) means that he wouldn’t be able to accept her strict religious beliefs. There are more instances of this sort of writing and behavior in throughout the show where the writers try to make some comment on a sensitive issue but end up turning it around and rarely talk about the issues.

There are certain problems they deal with directly, like different kinds of PTSD and physical trauma, that are commendable.

These are very good points. I’ve never seen the show, so I can’t comment on it either way, but while this blog is meant to uplift examples of diversity, in no way is it trying to excuse other ways that shows can be problematic.

Example of racial diversity: Grey’s Anatomy

Example of sexual diversity: Grey’s Anatomy

The show is an example of racial diversity through the main actors. Chandra Wilson, who plays Dr. Miranda Bailey, is an African American woman in a position of power over others in the show. Sara Ramirez, who plays Dr. Callie Torres, is a bisexual Mexican-American woman who has consistently been shown in biracial relationships. James Pickens Jr., an African-American man, plays Dr. Richard Webber, who was also depicted in a position of authority. At the last of regulars, Sandra Oh, a Korean-Canadian woman, plays Dr. Cristina Yang, who also has consistently been shown in biracial relationships.

Grey’s Anatomy also shows sexual diversity in its characters. Jessica Capshaw plays as Dr. Arizona Robbins, a lesbian, who is in a long-term committed relationship with Ramirez’s Torres.

Considering that this show is in it’s tenth season, I’m sure that I’ve missed examples of diversity. I have also been warned that this show includes a lot things that would be categorized as problematic, but I didn’t get any more information than that. If you have something else you think should be added, please comment on it!

districtcapaldi