compliments-people:
You're awesome and an amazing person!

Awww! Thank you!

— FYDII

posted 2 weeks ago with 0 notes
#ask #compliments-people

Example of racial diversity: Winx Club

Example of cultural diversity: Winx Club

This series is an example of racial and cultural diversity through main characters Musa, Flora, and starting Season 2, Aisha/Layla. Musa is from a culture that is Eastern Asian, but the specific culture is never given, and as such Musa is drawn in outfits that have roots in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean traditions. The creator of the series did, however, say that she was inspired by Lucy Liu. In a similar manner, Flora and Aisha/Layla’s specific cultural references were never identified, but he also said that Flora’s inspiration came from Jennifer Lopez, and that Aisha/Layla was inspired by Beyonce.

Racial diversity: The Cheetah Girls

Cultural diversity: The Cheetah Girls

The movies are an example of racial and cultural diversity by the four main characters; Galleria Garibaldi, Chanel Simmons, Dorinda Thomas, and Aqua Walker. Galleria was played by Raven-Symone, who is African-American. Aqua was played by Kiely Williams, who is also African-American. Chanel Simmons was played by Adrienne Bailon, the daughter of a mother from Puerto Rico and a father from Ecuador, and Dorinda was played by Sabrina Bryan, who is biracial (Latina/White).

Example of racial diversity: Fifth Harmony

Example of cultural diversity: Fifth Harmony

This group is an example of racial and cultural diversity through its members. Ally Brooke is Mexican-American. Dinah Jane Hansen has Polynesian and Dutch heritage. Camilla Cabello is Mexican/Cuban-American. Normani Hamilton is is African American. Lauren Jauregi is Cuban-American.

Example of cultural diversity: Avatar: The Legend of Korra

Example of racial diversity: Avatar: The Legend of Korra

This series is an example of both cultural and racial diversity through its main cast. Set in the same fantasy universe as Avatar: The Last Airbender, this series follows a Woman of Color, Korra (who is from a strongly-Inuit culture), and her friends Mako, Bolin (two brothers from a strongly Chinese culture), Asami (a woman who appears to come from a very Japanese culture), and her teacher, Tenzin, who is the leader of a culture that is very close to Tibet. The series itself deals with topics such as a culture in diaspora, the conflicts of technology versus tradition, and terrorism while also featuring more personal conflicts, such as characters discovering their ‘place’ in the universe, romantic issues, and finding (and making) their own families.

theangrylioness reblogged your photo and added:

Gi is from Thailand. But other than that, perfect.

Huh. For all of my childhood, I thought she was French, but your comment made me look it up, and apparently she did have friends in Thailand. Her dolphin had a Japanese name, though, and the Wikipedia article puts her as Malaysian*, so while it seems to be up for debate where in Asia she came from, she is very clearly Asian — as opposed to the Western European roots I thought she had. This is an honest oops, and now I’m even more glad, as the show had even more diversity than I thought it did. Thank you!

*(I’m not 100% sure on how reliable the Wikipedia article is, since it puts Kwame from Zimbabwe, even though his name means ‘born on Saturday’ in Akan and Twi, both languages in Ghana. Still — all of these nations mentioned have been very under-served and mis-represented in Western media, and if Gi or Kwame or Ma-Ti helped anyone feel less ‘other’, then the showrunners did well.)

posted 1 month ago with 0 notes
#theangrylioness #discussion

Example of racial diversity: The Suite Life of Zack and Cody

This show qualifies as an example of racial diversity through the characters London Tipton, Mr. Moseby, and Esteban Ramirez. London Tipton’s heritage is never discussed in the show, but her actress, Brenda Song, remains the only Hmong-American actress to have held a starring role in American television. Mr. Moseby is played by an African-American actor, Phil Lewis, and Esteban Ramirez is played by Latina/Hispanic actor Adrian R’Mante.

Example of racial diversity: Captain Planet

Example of cultural diversity: Captain Planet

This series was an example of both racial AND cultural diversity through its main cast, which featured an American boy, Wheeler; a Russian (then Soviet Union) girl, Linka; a French girl, Gi; a Brazilian boy, Ma-Ti; and an African boy from an unspecified country, Kwame (though his name suggests that he is from Ghana). Together, these teens worked together to help fight dangers to the environment and spread awareness of important issues. They were given powers by a racially ambiguous Earth Spirit named Gaia, and when they combined their powers, they formed Captain Planet, as featured above. The show ran for six seasons.

Example of racial diversity: Orange is the New Black

Example of gender identity diversity: Orange is the New Black

Example of class diversity: Orange is the New Black

Example of age diversity: Orange is the New Black

Example of sexual diversity: Orange is the New Black

Example of body type diversity: Orange is the New Black

This series is an example of racial diversity through the different groups of women in the prison, with many different members of the cast who are Latina/Hispanic or African-American.

This series is an example of gender identity through Laverne Cox, the trans woman who plays a trans woman inside the prison.

This series is an example of class diversity through the many different levels of class the inmates come from. Piper and her immediate circle of friends come from the upper class, with several women coming in at working middle class, and several others in the group at in the lower class.

This series is an example of age diversity through the different age groups the cast members come from. The youngest was stated to be 19, while the oldest known cast member’s age is 59.

This series is an example of sexual diversity, as it showcases characters who are straight, lesbian, and bisexual.

This series is an example of body image diversity, as the characters show a variety of body types.

Example of gender identity diversity: WOMEN in English/ Mujeres en Espanol!

Example of body type diversity: WOMEN in English/ Mujeres en Espanol!

Example of age diversity: WOMEN in English/ Mujeres en Espanol!

Example of racial diversity: WOMEN in English/ Mujeres en Espanol!

This series of illustrations shows gender identity diversity through the inclusions of someone who appears to be a trans woman, as well as someone who appears to be a cis woman, but feels most comfortable in menswear.

This series of illustrations more than qualifies as an example of body type diversity through several women in the collection. Some are around a societal weight ‘norm’, while others are shown as under it, and others are shown as far above it. All of these women are shown as beautiful.

This series of illustrations shows age diversity by showing women at several ages, from children to elderly.

This series of illustrations shows racial diversity by showing women of several races, including (but not limited to) women who appear to be of Latina/Hispanic origin, women who appear to be of African descent, women who appear to be of Asian descent, and several women whose race can’t be determined through the illustrations.

And while they didn’t qualify for the categories of ability diversity, there are also two illustrations that contain women who are in wheelchairs, one of them being a WOC, the other frankly discussing the issues associated with common treatments of disabled persons in society. The series of illustrations also barely did not qualify for the category of sexual diversity, as it frankly discussed some of the less kind treatment that women who identify as lesbians are often shown (with a biracial lesbian couple) as well as a woman who was openly bisexual.

There is a link to her original gallery here, in Spanish, as well as one where she has translated her works into English. There is also a group that is translating her illustrations into Hebrew.

districtcapaldi